The Unofficial Defiant Comics Archive
Last Update: 1/23/2016
DEFIANT COMICS  
Transcribed Editorials
 
All Cover Images and Graphics located on this site are ©1993-2016 by their respective owners. The content on this site is intended for review purposes only. 

Here are the transcribed Editorials of
 Deborah Purcell
EDITORIAL DIRECTOR
 
November 1993 Source:  Dark Dominion #2
It's 6:00 A.M on Monday, October 4th, and I'm looking out my office window at the dark Manhattan sky. Only one lit window-- much like that of our DEFIANT fortress--looms eeirily in my view, and suddenly I experience the great, lonely breadth of New York at night. Yet, in office buildings all over the city, there doubtless are pockets of activity much like that right here--people toiling together hard to meet a critical deadline, ravaged by exhaustion, but still putting heart and soul into the job that has to get done.  
 There were five of us here through the long hours just past--Joe James, Robert LaQuinta, George Roberts, Tim Perkins, and myself--and our mission was to finish painting, pasting up, and proofreading, DARK DOMINION #1. Our youngest staff member, Zach Lynch, arrived at  5:30 A.M to take the completed book and sprint with it to an international flight, delivering it to the printer on time.  
 Thursday, October 21st. 3:00 A.M...Once again, a DEFIANT penciler, inker, letterer, two colorist, a paste-up artist, and an editor continued to ply the comic book trade into the hours before dawn. Grey was here putting on the finishing touches on THE GOOD GUYS #1, as was the title's inker, Charles Yoakum. Tim Perkins painted pages of this issue, DARK DOMINION #2, while Oclair Silverio completed the cover of WARRIORS of PLASM #5. George Roberts was lettering PLASM #4, while Robert LaQuinta then took in hand to paste up.  
 I wonder if you have any idea how hard these guys work...some of them thousands of kilometers from home...other only the matter of a few miles, though it may as well be thousands, considering how infrequently they have an hour to themselves.  
 Before he began freelancing for us (painting the WARRIORS of PLASM Graphic Novel, "Home for the Holidays"), Oclair, who is from Sao Paulo, Brazil, had never been on a plane. He speaks a mere several words of English, is living alone in a modest hotel, and had to bid good-bye to his wife and 18-month-old son for more than a month. Likewise, Tim from Blackburn, England, who is here to color DARK DOMINION, had never before been to the States, and has not seen his wife, 10-year-old daughter, and 6 1/2-year-old son for the same length of time. And Charles, from Sacramento, California dropped everything on the West Coast for an indefinite for the good of  THE GOOD GUYS. 
 What a bunch of troopers. How trite it sounds to say it, but they're good men all...dedicated and true. I applaud them sincerely, and hope that you will think of them with as much respect, affection, and gratefulness as I do...day after day, night after night.  
 
Website Commentary: The question is, did they sleep late every day the next week?
 
November 1993 Source:  Warriors of Plasm -  
Home for the Holidays TBP
     The seduction of the Holidays... 
Warm hearths on a cold winter nights...aromatic turkeys basting in their juices...street-corner Santas jingling small, tinkly bells...frosted gingerbread men with tiny cinnamon eyes...a menorah's candles being lit one by one...a dreidel spinning on it's axis in a child's joyous game... 
 The crunch of snow beneath an adult's firm steps...crystalline stars aloft in a black December sky...the aromas of hot chocolate mingling with pinecone and evergreen...the rustle of wrapping paper...squeels of delight...the crescendo of yuletide trumpets on a stereo...and sighs of contentment all around... 
  
 For our Warriors of PLASM--Mrs. J, Reverend Gilbert, Shooter, Mouse, and Nudge--the holidays have never seemed more remote, more...alien. Having been catapulted from their homes and communities into a place "beyond the imaginary limits," they are only just beginning to fathom their predicament and grope for their bearings when, quite unexpectedly, it occurs to one and all that...it...is...Christmas.
 The smells, the sights, the sound of the holidays flood their collective senses, but all for naught: These are memories only--PLASM has nothing to offer in their stead. It is a land of Zoms and mulch gullets, of lust-games and Splatterball; it reeks of militarism and hedonism, of spilled gore and imprisoned hearts. It is a land without tradition, without ritual, without "humanity"--it is a land, in short, that couldn't posibly understand "the holidays."
 Or could it?
 In the pages ahead, Len Wein and Dave Cockrum collaborate on a journey with our five heroes and heroines, depicting them in their innocence, their awakenings, their blunders, and their stupendous attemps to challenge the odds.
 Will they evwer escape PLASM? Will they ever return to Earth? Will they ever again celebrate Christmas?
 Believe it or not, only their hairdresser knows for sure....

                                                                                                                   Deborah Purcell
                                                                                                                   Editorial Director
 

 
 
Website Commentary: With a $5.95 price, the "Home for the Holidays" Trade Paperback  was a really poised to be an important story that surely would be under-ordered by retailers. What better way to disguise a critical story than hide it in a Christmas special? Prior to this comic's release, a higher priced comic tied to a comic series would usually feature something of earth shattering significance. As a result it would fuel a frantic collector frenzy when the frugal collectors realized they had neglected to buy that super-hot higher priced book. they were usually critical to own. Retailers at this point knew not to underestimate the significance of higher priced "special issues". They were usually worth the gamble. This issue was ordered by retailers aggressively. Surely this would be important! Didn't this creative team bring us the New X-men?

Sorry.

This is perhaps one of the least inspiring books that Defiant ever released. It offers almost nothing to the continuity. At no point does any of the content seem relevant to what was going on in the regular series. Retailers were burned. They overordered it and were stuck with inventory. Fans were disappointed. The value was simply not there. This book was a coffin nail in retailer support. The fan's positive reaction was not there. Other companies were feeding the speculator frenzy, Defiant through negligence.... lost fans with this very unnecessary and expensive Trade Paperback. 

 
December 1993 Source: Dark Dominion #3, Good Guys #2
It's intriguing to me how, after twenty year in publishing, I find myself in virgin territory. Producing comic books is not a complete 180 from publishing magazines or books, but it is different--and therefore fascinating--in a number of significant ways.  
  To begin with, creating comic books is synonymous with creating characters--characters one "lives with" on a daily basis and therefore gets to know...and grows to believe in. 
  Intellectually, of course, I know that Mrs. J, and Rick, and Reverend Gilbert, and Shooter, and Cookie are fictitious--are not listed in the New Jersey phone directories. At the same time, I almost feel like calling them up--Mrs. J, especially--to find out how they're doing...and, dare I say it?...to even ask them for a little tactical and moral support in getting along in my own life. 
  I feel a certain that Mrs. J would be warm and sympathetic--understanding my problems, yet at the same time encouraging me to "keep my chin up." As for Rick, I'm not sure he would have all that much to say, but I have no doubt that I'd relish just being in his presence for a while, feeling comforted by his solidity and aura of calm, by his strong convictions that "right" will prevail. Cookie and I would probably become friends. She'd make me laugh (in a nice way) because she's a little bit of a bleeding heart, but I'd admire and want to emulate her courage and her strength of will; she'd be a worthy role model.  
  Preach is a little harder to decipher. Not that he's complicated as a human being--I don't believe that he is. But his commitment to religion, to his God, encapsulates him, in a sense. He certainly is a giving person, however, and I'm sure that, over time, his actions will express the breadth of his character. I'd like to learn from him. And Shooter, who's fearless, and always tensed to leap into the fray, is a sure bet for instruction in stamina and endurance under pressure.  
  To a disinterested observer, it would sound absurd that these characters are becoming influential in my life. But Jim Shooter and David Lapham--who gave birth to the Warriors of PLASM, delineating them from their physiognomies to their psyches to their personalities--made them palpably real.  
  When Jim coined the slogan Beyond the Imaginary Limits, I didn't understand it's meaning. Now I do. Beyond the Imaginary Limits is where Mrs. J, Reverend Gilbert and Shooter and Mouse and Nudge reside. I do not know why they exist or where they are going--but I do know that I feel inextricably linked to them.. that I have hitched myself to their star. 
   
Website Commentary: This point of view is echoed by many fans of Mr. Shooter's work. 
 
February 1994 Source:  Charlemagne #0
Picture an isolation tank--picture yourself  inside one. It's pitch-dark, and you're suspended in water, suspended in time... for you have no reference points whatsoever--visual, aural, tactile. You are completely cut off from your world. Your memory and imagination are the only tools you have to link yourself to sanity--unless they drive you mad first. 
  This is how I think of the Vietnam experience. For years and years, scores of American men and women were cut off from their homes, their families, their lives. They were set adrift in a strange land. Like Giacometti sculptures, they were starkly alone. Their pain was enormous, apocalyptic--yet they were isolated in a land completely across the world from their own, and no one was there to hear the sounds of their anguish. 
  Fifty-eight thousand body bags were used to encapsulate the dead... such ironic closure for those who had already, long before, been severed from everything that meant "life." And what of their coworkers and friends? Each was as fated as the dead: Some would complete a tour of duty; Some would be captured by the V.C. and become P.O.W.; some would end up M.I.A. Those who would live would not suffer the ignominy of inane death, yet the vast majority would either feel the ghastly string of American ingratitude or choke on the stench of their own nightmares. 
  I am haunted by this war, though I was not there, nor were any of my loved ones. Night after night I watched it flit by on the evening news, and though I was politically opposed, I didn't shed a tear. Tet, My Lai, the DMZ--everything was an abstraction. Was it because I'd already experienced President Kennedy's death? And Dr. Martin Luthor King's? And Bobboy Kennedy's? And seen the Newark riots of 1964? And all the other riots of that tempestuous summer? Was a child of the 60's exposed to so many horrors that she became injured and impervious to "one more"? 
  Perhaps, for a time. 
  It didn't last. 
  Today, and for many years now, I have felt a gut-wrenching pain for the men and women who fought the war for us. I feel too, compassion for the Vietnamese people and how they are faring. History has forever linked our countries together... 
  As you'll see, Phil Nutman and Adam Pollina have take these thoughts and woven them into the fabric of a powerful and mesmerizing drama, with a lead character of extraordinary sensitivity and courage. His name is Charlemagne. You'll learn his history and his quest in issue #1, in March 1994. Meanwhile, we present to you a small but tantalizing preview... CHARLEMAGNE #0. 
                                                             Deborah Purcell 
                                                             Editorial Director 
 
Website Commentary:  This editorial deals with very little other than the first issue of Charlemagne. Compare it to her March 1994 editorial which alters the closing paragraph.
 
February 1994 Source: Dark Dominion #5 
After six months or fewer in existence, WARRIORS of PLASM, DARK DOMINION, and THE GOOD GUYS have become such an integral part of the comic book lexicon, it's hard to believe that only a year ago they didn't exist. It's been a phenomenal experience, this past year, seeing these titles conceived, developed, created, and shepherded through production. I have worked for many years, with many talented individuals, but I don't think I have ever seen so much talent concentrated at one time, in one endeavor--the creation of the DEFIANT Universe. 
 In no particular order, I'd like to acknowledge these exceptional and dedeicated creatorswithout whom DEFIANT would not be the exceptional publisher that it is and will continue to become. Thanks, then, to Jim Brown, Keith Wilson, Alan Weiss, Adam Polina, Grey, Phil Nutman, Len Wein, Charles Yoakum, Bob Downs, Joe James, Rob LaQuinta, George Roberts, Agnes Pinaha, Steve Leialoha, Marcus David, Kenny Lopez, Chris Claremont, Josť Marzan, Greg Boone, Tom Ziuko, Oclair Silverio, Rod Ollerenshaw, Benny Jung, Su McTeague, Tim Perkins, Charli Adlard, Jan Childress, Mike Witherby, Sandy DiPasquale, Mike Barreiro, Bob Sharen, Bob Smith, Mike DeLepine, Alex Jay, Steve Ditko, Dave Cockrum, and last, but by no means least, David and Maria Lapham. 
 I am very grateful for the experience of working with each and every one of them.  
 And so has ended 1993, year one of DEFIANT, and on we've moved into 1994... and judging from what we've got on the drawing boards, it is bound to be a happy year indeed! 
 In just a few weeks from now, on February 22, our New title--WAR DANCER--will thunder into existence. It is an extyremely forceful book, with elements of power, grace, pathos, an mysticism. It raises many questions about the origins of the DEFIANT Universe, including PLASM, and over time it will reveal deep and compelling answers.  
 A month later on March 29, a title with equal splendor and majesty--CHARLEMAGNE--will launch, inviting readers into an odyssey of purity and pain and redemption. It features exotic setting and situations, and it's protagonist--Charles Smith--will prove to be one of the most profoundly interesting heros ever to grace the pages of a comic book. 
 (Be sure to watch for the issue when War Dancer and Charlemagne meet!) 
 Three other titles now in development are DOGS of WAR, GLORY, and THE GREAT GRIMMAX. DOGS is deliciously gritty, GLORY may take the industry by storm with it's utterly unique heroine, and THE GREAT GRIMMAX will give new meaning to the phrase "a stranger in a strange land".  
 Her at DEFIANT we're working hard to publish comics that you'll enjoy, that you'll ponder, that will take you on an exciting visual journey--and that you'll want to read again and again and again. Your input about any facet of the process is appreciated by both our staff and our freelancers. We'll look forward to working  for you, and hearing  from you, in this new year. Happy 1994! 
                                                             Deborah Purcell 
 
Website Commentary:  No comments. 
 
February 1994 Source:  Good Guys #4
War Dancer has come to Earth, and Earth will never be the same.  
  The Dancer appears poised and benign, yet despite his warrior-type garb--yet he could be one f the most potent forces of destruction ever to rock our planet.  
  Who is he? Where does he come from? Why is he here? An what can Earth do to shield itself from his possibly cataclysmic presence? 
  Or has he come not to inflict misery but to alleviate it, not to hasten the apocalypse, but to prevent it? 
  Startlingly, the debut of this commanding new DEFIANT title comes right on the heels of the Los Angeles earthquake, a quake that heaved a mountain six inches higher into the sky and that left many Angelinos dead and injured and thousands and thousands more in states of shock, homelessness, and despair...Angelinos who had just survived devastating fires, rains, and riots over the past few months and years.  
  Many other such natural tragedies have recently beset other parts of the U.S. and certainly the world: Hurricanes Andrew and Hugo...the Midwestern floods...this winter's arctic cold spell that wiped out well over 50 lives... 
  Natural disasters in countries around the globe are legion, as well--earthquakes and volcanoes, hurricanes and typhoons, monsoons and tidal waves....Yet. I wonder: Do other people in other countries rail against their gods, decrying their fate, hurling epithets at those they view as traitors? 
  Despite their anguish, I think this is probably not so. And, if not, how very different from the American view! Not to in any way belittle my fellow men and women, especially those in Los Angeles (and I have a brother I love dearly who lives mere miles from the quake's epicenter), but I sense that Americans perceive themselves as so invulnerable, so determined, so "in charge" and "take charge", that their will alone shall always be sufficient to defy nature. It is a singularly arrogant view, yet hopelessly naive at the same time. 
  This is one of the reasons War Dancer has come to Earth. He knows that we are in great danger--in danger of annihilation--and that we are too innocent, too ever-hopeful, to know it ourselves. He has come to save us...if we prove ourselves worthy of it. It means that we must grow up. That we must face forces bigger than ourselves and allow them to play themselves out, regardless of their cost. 
  For there is nothing else we can do. 
   
Website Commentary: No comment.
 
March 1994 Source:  Charlemagne #1
Picture an isolation tank--picture yourself  inside one. It's pitch-dark, and you're suspended in water, suspended in time... for you have no reference points whatsoever--visual, aural, tactile. You are completely cut off from your world. Your memory and imagination are the only tools you have to link yourself to sanity--unless they drive you mad first. 
  This is how I think of the Vietnam experience. For years and years, scores of American men and women were cut off from their homes, their families, their lives. They were set adrift in a strange land. Like Giacometti sculptures, they were starkly alone. Their pain was enormous, apocalyptic--yet they were isolated in a land completely across the world from their own, and no one was there to hear the sounds of their anguish. 
  Fifty-eight thousand body bags were used to encapsulate the dead... such ironic closure for those who had already, long before, been severed from everything that meant "life." And what of their coworkers and friends? Each was as fated as the dead: Some would complete a tour of duty; Some would be captured by the V.C. and become P.O.W.; some would end up M.I.A. Those who would live would not suffer the ignominy of inane death, yet the vast majority would either feel the ghastly string of American ingratitude or choke on the stench of their own nightmares. 
  I am haunted by this war, though I was not there, nor were any of my loved ones. Night after night I watched it flit by on the evening news, and though I was politically opposed, I didn't shed a tear. Tet, My Lai, the DMZ--everything was an abstraction. Was it because I'd already experienced President Kennedy's death? And Dr. Martin Luthor King's? And Bobboy Kennedy's? And seen the Newark riots of 1964? And all the other riots of that tempestuous summer? Was a child of the 60's exposed to so many horrors that she became injured and impervious to "one more"? 
  Perhaps, for a time. 
  It didn't last. 
  Today, and for many years now, I have felt a gut-wrenching pain for the men and women who fought the war for us. I feel too, compassion for the Vietnamese people and how they are faring. History has forever linked our countries together... 
  As you'll see, Phil Nutman and Adam Pollina have take these thoughts and woven them into the fabric of a powerful and mesmerizing drama, with a lead character of extraordinary sensitivity and courage. His name is Charles Smith, though his best friend, Doc, calls him Charlemagne... Charles the Great. In this premiere issue, he--though merely a child--goes in search of his M.I.A. brother in Vietnam. It is an unparalled quest, one that will not only irrevocably change him--but one that will change the entire course of the world.  
                                                             Deborah Purcell 
                                                             Editorial Director 
 
Website Commentary: This is a slight variation of the editorial she wrote for Charlemagne #0. Only the last paragraph is different. The closing comments sound like something Jim Shooter might have written with her. 
 
 

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